5 haunting images from Denver’s water system

From a creepy cemetery to an abandoned hotel to functioning facilities, take a look at the spookier side of Denver Water.

October 26, 2018 | By: Cathy Proctor

Sure, Denver Water usually shares pictures of the many beautiful, scenic vistas and interesting places that exist across our watersheds, reservoirs and operations.

But there are places that can be … well … downright spooky at times. Here are a few haunting images to celebrate the Halloween season.

Enjoy!

A tree looms over Lehow Cemetery near Waterton Canyon. Many families who worked at Denver Water’s old, now closed, Kassler water treatment plant, have buried relatives in this nearby cemetery.
A tree looms over Lehow Cemetery near Waterton Canyon. Many families who worked at Denver Water’s old, now closed, Kassler water treatment plant have buried relatives in this nearby cemetery. Photo credit: Denver Water.
Mist rising off one of the treatment beds, where water is filtered through tiny pieces of sand and anthracite coal, at the Marston Treatment Plant, one of Denver Water’s three drinking water treatment facilities.
Mist rising off one of the treatment beds, where water is filtered through sand and tiny pieces of anthracite coal, at the Marston Treatment Plant, one of Denver Water’s three drinking water treatment facilities. Photo credit: Denver Water.
The South Platte Hotel, near the confluence of the North Fork and the South Platte rivers, was a popular resort in the early 1900s. Denver Water acquired the hotel and other properties in the area as part of plans in the 1980s to build the Two Forks dam along the South Platte.
The South Platte Hotel, near the confluence of the North Fork and the South Platte rivers, was a popular resort in the early 1900s. Denver Water acquired the hotel and other properties in the area as part of plans in the 1980s to build the Two Forks dam along the South Platte. Photo credit: Denver Water.
Underneath one of Hillcrest’s two old, concrete, treated water storage tanks in south Denver, which dated to the 1960s, before they were removed and replaced as part of a multi-year capital improvement program.
Underneath one of Hillcrest’s two old, concrete, treated water storage tanks in south Denver, which dated to the 1960s, before they were removed and replaced as part of a multi-year capital improvement program. Photo credit: Denver Water.
A gray day at Lehow Cemetery, which dates to the late 1800s, near Waterton Canyon. Many families who worked at Denver Water’s old, now closed, Kassler water treatment plant, have buried relatives in this cemetery.
A gray day at Lehow Cemetery, which dates to the late 1800s, near Waterton Canyon. Many families who worked at Denver Water’s old, now closed, Kassler water treatment plant have buried relatives in this cemetery. Photo credit: Denver Water.

2 thoughts on “5 haunting images from Denver’s water system”

  1. One of my first field trips here at Denver Water was to crawl around under the old Hillcrest Reservoir with Jim Weldon checking for leaks. Very freaky!

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