Renewin’ it and brewin’ it

Denver brewery helping Denver Water celebrate a milestone with water purified in Colorado.

April 13, 2018 | By: Jay Adams

Times change. Cities grow. And the need for water continues to increase. Denver Water has seen a lot of that in its first 100 years of operation.

Shana Colcleasure, operations technician at Denver Water, fills up a container of purified water at the PureWater Colorado Demonstration Project.
Shana Colcleasure, operations technician at Denver Water, fills up a container of purified water for Declaration Brewery at the PureWater Colorado Demonstration Project.

But some things never change, like people’s love of beer.

So in 2018, Denver Water is melding the past with the future, combining that time-tested, beer-loving tradition with a cutting-edge project going on at our Recycling Plant. We are partnering with Declaration Brewery to create a special beer to commemorate our 100th anniversary, a beer brewed using a unique water reuse process.

“Our motto is ‘Make a statement,’ and that’s what we plan to do with this brew,” said Mike Baker, scientist in residence at Declaration Brewery.

The water came from the PureWater Colorado Demonstration Project — an advanced water purification system on display at Denver Water through mid-April that provides a way to reuse water for drinking.

The demonstration project takes water that’s been used by in homes and gone through the cleaning process at Metro Wastewater. The advanced technology at the PureWater project then purifies the water so it’s safe to drink. 

A tanker truck delivers 4,000 gallons of purified water to Declaration Brewery.
A tanker truck delivers 4,000 gallons of purified water to Declaration Brewery.

Four thousand gallons of this purified water were delivered to Declaration, which plans to use it to brew 80 barrels of beer — or 2,480 gallons.

“We’re going to brew a nice pilsner beer, which is light in color, to highlight the purity of the water,” Baker said.

Declaration is a Certifiably Green Denver brewery and has worked with Denver Water in the past on efficient use of water.

“We’re all about trying new things and being sustainable, so when we heard about the PureWater project, we jumped at the chance to brew a beer with it,” he said.

Declaration will use the same brewing techniques as it does with its other beers. The water produced at the PureWater project meets all state and federal drinking water standards, and Declaration worked with health officials during its planning process.

Vince Bingen, brewer at Declaration Brewery, checks on the purified water that will be used to make a special craft beer to celebrate Denver Water's 100th Anniversary.
Vince Bingen, brewer at Declaration Brewery, checks on the purified water that will be used to make a special craft beer to celebrate Denver Water’s 100th Anniversary.

“We support innovative and sustainable uses of water,” said Kathie Dudas, Denver Water’s marketing manager. “That’s why Declaration’s use of water from this project for beer is a great way to educate the public about the many ways we can reuse water.”

The beer is being brewed to commemorate Denver Water’s 100th anniversary celebration. Declaration will sell the special edition beer at its brewery and distribute it to liquor stores and restaurants throughout the summer.

Proceeds from the beer will be donated to educational scholarships and endowments that support careers in the water industry.

2 thoughts on “Renewin’ it and brewin’ it”

  1. NO THANKS, NO SUCH THING AS PURIFIED RECYCLED TOILET WATER, I AM NOT DRINKING RECYCLED TOILET WATER, IMPOSSIBLE TO GET OUT 100 PERCENT OF TOXINS OUT OF TOILET WATER, CALL IT WHAT IT IS: DRINKING RECYCLED TOILET WATER, NOT JUST RECYCLED IN HOME WATER, SOUNDS LIKE 3RD WORLD COUNTRY SOLUTIONS, YOU NEED TO BUILD MORE WATER CAPTURE SYSTEMS LIKE IN RESERVOIRS, LOOKING TO TAKE THE EASY WAY OUT, AND BE POLITICALLY CORRECT. SOME BACK WORD THINKING GOING ON, REALLY , PURIFIED TOILET WATER TO DRINK.

    1. This water meets all state and federal standards for potable (or drinking) water.

      Although, not a Denver Water project, the PureWater Colorado project demonstrates one of several ways that communities in Colorado can meet future needs in light of projected population growth, climate change and water scarcity. It uses advanced water purification technology to produce safe, high-quality water. The multi-barrier approach of consecutive cleaning steps work together to remove or destroy contaminants, with water quality monitoring and safeguards built into the process train to ensure the resulting water is safe to drink. Cities in California, Florida and Texas are all currently using similar treatment processes to serve drinking water to their communities.

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